Early Onset Dementia

CARE ASSIST IS UNIQUE IN FOCUSSING ON THE NEEDS OF PEOPLE WHO DEVELOP DEMENTIA AT AN EARLY AGE

Alzheimer's UK forecast that Young Onset Dementia affects around 17,000 people in the UK under the age of 64, and this is not expected to grow over the next 10 or so years. However the society will also tell you that they believe that there are many undiagnosed withYoung Onset Dementia - and the figure could be nearer 50,000.

When you compare it the fact that there are a total of 800,000 people with dementia, which is expected to rise to 1 million in 2021 and 1.7 million in 2051 - you can realise why the focus is on late onset dementia.

Care Assists is unique in that is focuses totally on Young Onset Dementia.

The number of specialist services is growing, as more people come to understand the needs of younger people with dementia, but progress is slow. Provision of services for younger people is variable around the country, and some regions still have few, if any, services.

TYPES OF EARLY ONSET DEMENTIA (EOD)

Only one third of people suffering from EOD have Alzheimer's which compares with two out of three sufferers over 65.

Vascular accounts for 20%, Fronto-Temporal is 12% which is most commonly found in the 45-65 age group and 40% of these have a family history with the disease.

10% is Alcohol related or Dementia with Lewy Bodies and the remaining 20% are rarer causes.

Alzheimer's UK say

"There is little awareness or understanding of the needs of people who develop dementia at an early age, and this can make it very difficult for younger people to access adequate support.

There are sometimes significant age-related barriers for younger people trying to get access to dementia services. If no specialist services exist, younger people with dementia can find themselves lost between services, none of which will accept responsibility for their care.

Even if dementia services accept younger users, the type of care they provide may not be appropriate. The needs of younger people with dementia and their friends and family are not just related to age. Younger people may have different concerns and interests to older people. A service set up for people of a different generation, where activities are planned for older people who are less physically active, is unlikely to meet the needs of younger people.

Younger people with dementia require specialist services, able to meet their complex needs. Specialist services should strive to help people maintain their day-to-day skills, friendships, hobbies and interests, and support people to continue to live an active life as a member of the local community."